Educators and history buffs in Utah will be happy to find Tales from Indian Country: Authentic Stories and Legends from the Great Uintah Basin by George Emery Stewart, Jr.

From the back cover:George Emery Stewart, Jr
George Emery Stewart, Jr. was one of those colorful ‘old timers’ whose life spanned the ‘old days’ and the ‘modern days.’ He was born in Vernal, Utah in 1906. Because his early playmates were Indian boys, he spoke Ute fluently. Through this close association and friendship with the Ute tribe, he developed a keen understanding of their ways and beliefs. He respected and defended them throughout his life.
Later, his family moved to Myton, where his mother ran a hotel. Here he met Elza Lay, a retired member of “The Wild Bunch.” When he was not in school, young George spent much of his time sitting with Lay on the bench in front of the saloon. He listened for hours and asked many questions of Lay. …
He was a member of the Utah Historical Society and the Utah Western Historians until his death in March 1990. George Stewart, a practicing attorney in Roosevelt, also wrote articles for the Salt Lake Tribune and Early West.

INDIAN STORIES AND LEGENDS
The Story of the Headhunters
The Woman Who Was a Man
The Forgotten Chieftain, Red Moon
Chipeta, “Queen of the Utes”
Song to Chipeta, Queen of the Utes
The Legend of Spirit Rock
Wild Man of the Wasteland
Arapeel
Bear Talk
Beliefs and Ways of the Indian
Johnny Harper Nick
The Pit of Hades
The Fires of Spring
Indian Anecdote
Utah Big Game Hunt: Circa 700 AD
Did Yeti Once Roam the Valleys of Utah?
Hidden Petroglyphs
The Demon of Horseshoe Bend
Horse Thieves from Brown’s Hole

EARLIEST WHITE VISITORS TO THE UINTAH BASIN
Passage Through the Land of the Sun
Ouray
Utah’s First Christmas
The Old Adobe Fort on the Green
Escalante-Dominguez Trail
The Incomparable Ute

NINE-MILE ROAD
Nine-Mile Road
The Wells
The Moffat Railroad

THE STRIP AND FORT DUCHESNE
The Whiskey Tent Treaty
The Strip (Dakota, Badger, and Sergeant; Baco; Bob Ricker; The Dutchman; The Bandit Horse of Uintah; The Millionaire; Tabby Weep; Jones–the Cowhand; The St. Louis Mine Disaster; Bob Hughes)
Fort Duchesne
The Spanish-American War
The Trooper’s Valentine
Honey Joe Lee–Singing Sam and the Bullfrog
Wong Sing
Nu-pah-gath-ti-ket (Bottle Hollow)

OUTLAW STORIES
The Outlaw City
The Wild Bunch
The Baffled Ambuscade
Blazing Guns in the Bookcliffs
Mystery of the Outlaw Gold
The Death of an Outlaw

THE OPENING
The Opening I
The Opening II
Myton, the Queen of the Reservation
The Day the Bridge Went Dry
The Cottontail
The Last War Trail of the Whiterivers
The Shoot-Out
Aeroplane Day in Myton
Roosevelt History
The Rumble of the Uintahs

JOURNEY THROUGH A LOST COUNTRY
Chandler–The Canyon of Mystery
Passage of the River
The Watcher

First paragraph from The Opening I:
Purposely, or inadvertently, one of the most colorful events in the history of Utah has been overlooked by historians for many decades. Only lately, has the legendary event gained any notice from western writers–most of whom keep their eyes forever glued on the entrance of the Saints into the valley of the Great Salt Lake and its environs. This, then is a short story dealing with the event known to most old-timers as “The Opening.”
Read my favorite story from this book, The Cottontail.
Order a copy of this 320-page paperback book (reg. $19.95) for $16 plus $7 shipping.




 

George Stewart was Penny Gardner’s grandfather-in-law. Penny did most of the typing of George’s handwritten stories for this book